Full Steam Ahead!

So just an update on my training as I move into summer and my big, big plans.  That means no sweet or sad, aww-shucks, human-interest angles this time around.  Trust me, there will be plenty of that coming soon.  And lots of posts—because this is it (I’m saying it), the summer of my comeback (finally).

Winter went as well as could be expected, and though I had modest goals, I accomplished them (I think this will be part of my new strategy:  set attainable goals, meet them, and then move on to the next, more difficult one–instead of drawing that line in the sand (like a 5 minute mile or a 18 minute 5K) that is so far away I can’t even see it).

January to April I averaged 27 miles of running a week with an average weekly workout time of 7.25 hours (so roughly half my training hours were swimming, weights, and a little biking).  My goals at the start of the year were to get to April with my knee feeling good, stay in reasonable running shape, and do lots of swimming to prepare for the Illinois Masters State swim meet and get some best times there.  I paid close attention to my times during swim workouts and made a conscious decision not to pay attention to my running pace, even on the days I went faster than usual, doing a fartlek or strides or just running harder than usual.  I went just on feel, knowing that once the swim season was over I’d have plenty of time to focus on it.

shamrock shuffle start line

One week before the State swim meet, I ran the Shamrock Shuffle 8K in Chicago.  I signed up for this mid-winter to make sure I stayed focused enough on running and because I knew it would be a good place to check my fitness before I started getting more serious about my speed.  Because I hadn’t been timing any of my workouts, I had no idea how fast (or maybe slow is a better word) I would run.  I thought anywhere between 31 and 34 was possible, though 31 would’ve been a delightful surprise and 34 may have been the end of me (as in I would’ve been too depressed to carry on).  But I ran exactly 32 minutes, which I was happy enough with, and more importantly, really enjoyed the race.  It’s a big one with lots of packs and people to run with, the weather was great, and I felt pretty good until the last mile when my legs got a little heavy and a few people passed me going up Mount Roosevelt, but it was loads of fun and I know I can go a lot faster once I start to get more deliberate about my speed.

I actually ran 8 miles home from Grant Park after that race, which gave me 16 for the day, and I was sore in various ways afterwards.  I had planned to do a little light running that week, though my main focus was going to be tapering and sharpening up for the swim meet the next weekend, but once I got to Thursday and still hadn’t run, I decided to take the whole week off.  Crazy!  But I figured I’d swim better and would be refreshed for my next phase of run training.

The swim meet went well.  I am now a proud (but completely non-essential) member of the 3-time Illinois Masters State Championships swim team!  I did a total of 8 races in two days (including relays) and got best times in a number (but not all) events.  Swim races are intense, especially the sprints.  They go by in blur of effort and pain.  I think I’ve become not a bad swimmer for a runner, but I’m still slow when compared to real swimmers, and that will never change. Still, the meet was a blast and swimming is great training as my heart and lungs are always working hard, hard, hard when I’m in the pool.

smelts championship photo 2017

My plan was to get right into more serious run training, but I had an unexpected lag, just from life taking up too much time.  To be specific, my lovely, perfect wife and I went to France (Paris and Normandy) with her parents and met up with her brother and his wife and family.  A great adventure, but I did miss some days of running.  Then work got busier than usual and I had a number of early morning meetings and long days.  Finally, we are in the process of buying a house and selling our condo and that’s taken up a bit of time and energy too.  So, over the last 5 weeks while I’ve averaged 29 miles a week, which is not bad, I’ve done only 5.5 hours of workouts per week, way down from earlier in the year.

eiffel tower pic

But the semester is over and this last week has been much better (I think I’ll get in over 35 miles running and 10 hours total).  My knee has been relatively sound.  I hadn’t needed a cortisone shot since October (7 months–good work, knee!) but I’d been feeling more frequent discomfort up steps and sometimes just when twisting so I got another shot last week and everything feels strong now.  And if you are reading this blog because you’ve also got knee trouble, the two other things which may have helped are icing the knee frequently, especially after runs, and taking Celadrin (both in capsule and lotion form).  This is in addition to the other supplements I take.  Who knows which, if any of my methods, are working, but I feel good now so I will just keep doing it all.

For the summer, I’ve got a few races planned already.  I am probably going to do the Lincoln Park Run for the Zoo 10K on June 4, just as another see-where-I-am race.  I am definitely going to run the Steamboat Classic 4 miler in Peoria June 17th, and for my big goal for the summer I am planning to do the Steelhead 70.3 Half-Ironman Triathlon in Michigan on August 13th (I’m a little hesitant to sign up for this as I want to be sure my knee can handle it, and it costs $300!) but I’m pretty sure I’ll register soon. Hopefully I will add in some other low-key races over the summer if all goes well and then ideally a couple faster races in the fall and don’t worry, I’ll be sure to tell you all about them.  So check back if you are curious.  And have a good summer yourself!

Steelhead swim

You can’t beat the system!

Earlier this year, the parking on our streets in Chicago became “permit-only” from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m.  This was great because there are music venues in the neighborhood and there have been times when I’d gotten home late when there were concerts and I had to park nearly a mile from home.  My lovely perfect wife has an annual sticker with permit parking privileges.  My situation is more complicated.  Though I live in Chicago full-time, I still work in Wisconsin, my car has Wisconsin plates, and I don’t have a city sticker with the permit.  However, I do have a glove box full of nightly guest stickers I can fill out, place on my windshield, and park on the streets close to home.  Now even though I’ve got a big supply, I have, on occasion, peeled off the sticker already affixed to my windshield, written over the old date with a new one, slapped it back on the glass, and parked for another night.  Now I don’t know if I do this because of my frugal nature, to try to get away with something, or as a form of protest, but I do it.  Not every time, but whenever the numbers seem adaptable to change, I figure, why not?  And I’ve parked overnight like this many times with no penalty.

So last night when I got home around 6 p.m., I pulled the sticker off, changed the date from 12/21 to 12/30 (we’d been out of town for the holidays and there are some blocks where permits are not needed—if you are wondering how I’d gone 9 days without a fresh sticker) and didn’t think about it.  Later we went to a friend’s house for her birthday (my wife drove) and as we were getting home around midnight, we drove past my car and I saw it—a parking ticket!   On my car!  I couldn’t believe it.  I can be a real stoic about things, but when it comes to parking tickets, they feel like a personal affront.  I don’t know why this is, but I was justifiably (I thought) upset.

We pulled over and I jumped out of the car to grab the ticket besmirching my what-should-have-been-clear windshield.  But before I did I snapped a picture that showed both the ticket and my valid nightly pass in place.  There’d been a concert at the Riviera Ballroom and I figured there had been some cars parked illegally.  But I was also sure mine was not one of them.  Clearly, I thought, someone had made a mistake.  In fact, I was so sure of myself by the time I’d carried it upstairs and got ready for bed, I’d put it out of my mind, unusual for a parking ticket, which often leaves me stewing.  In the morning, I’d simply write a letter protesting the ticket, send it in with my photographic proof, and that would be it.

ticket

I didn’t even open the envelope to read the details on the ticket until this morning but when I did, I saw the violation:  “Reused Residential Parking Permit.”  I couldn’t believe it, but they had me.  It wasn’t a mistake–they accused me of exactly what I had done.  I looked at the photo I’d taken the night before—the changed date looked pretty good, and I’d gotten by with worse in the past, but there was no denying that it had been changed and I was guilty as charged.  It felt anger again, but now it was towards myself.  I’d tried to beat the system, to cheat it, but the system couldn’t be beat.

What does any of this have to do with my running?  Well, I feel like maybe I’ve been trying to “beat the system” with that too.  I was going to write a post today marking the 4 year anniversary of my microfracture surgery and ruminating on the fact that though I’ve made progress and fought the good fight over the last four years, I’ve definitely hit a plateau.

plateau

I just looked over my post from last year at this time and not much has changed.  My “best workouts of the year” were pretty much the same for both 2015 and 2016.  Neither year was terrible, and I’m not getting worse, but I want to improve.

I looked back over my training log and found that in 2016 I ran 1,213 miles, or an average of 23 miles a week.  I say I’m trying to beat the system because there’s no way I can run the times I want to on such low mileage.  Even though I did lots of other workouts-swimming, biking, weights, et cetera, there’s nothing like running to get better at running.  It’s very simple that way.  Of course, this is different than trying to beat the permit parking lovers-leapsystem—I have plenty of stickers and could put up a fresh, new one every night.  I’ve got no excuses.  It’s not as easy with running.  My knee is not fresh, new, or strong enough to run without consequences.  I just can’t run like I used to.  Sometimes this makes me feel  despondent, like the plateau I’m on is leading to a steep cliff, a Lover’s Leap, and I’m just going to over the edge and give up the chase for good.

Luckily, this feeling has always passed and I’ve believed the plateau will lead to something more, something better.   And looking back over my log, I was surprised to find I did have an 11 week stretch from mid-April to the end of June when I averaged 35 miles a week, including 3 weeks when I reached 40 miles.  That was with cross-training and really my knee was no worse for the wear (which means it was still a problem, but not any more or less than other times of the year).  I didn’t get a chance to see what kind of shape I was in because the only race I did was a triathlon and the 10K course was short so I don’t know how fast I ran and the next day we embarked on  our summer of travel.

But 35 miles a week doesn’t seem too bad.  It’s not 60, which I’d guess would be ideal for me, but it’s a substantial increase from 23.  And I think at 35 miles per week, making the most of those miles, of course, with good workouts and a good training plan, and some cross-training, well, that might be enough to get me back to some kind of racing shape.  I’ve never been one to really make New Year’s resolutions, but I’ve just decided I’m setting a goal of 35 miles a week for 2017.

It might be better to have a race goal, a particular time, and I’ve written about some of those already, but I think this will be better because if I can handle that mileage, I’ll discover whether or not this plateau I’m on can lead to greater heights and I can start doing races again and set time goals.  Or I’ll discover I need to just settle in and enjoy the view from where I’m at, with the times and racing success I want in sight but out of reach.plateau-valensole

This would means giving up racing goals for good and just running for the sake of it, and maybe shuffling through some triathlons with the rest of the non-runners.  Obviously, I’m hoping for the former, to complete this comeback, and I’m always pretty optimistic, but the latter would not be the worst thing in the world.  It would be better than never running again, which is what the surgeon told me was probably going to be the case when I came out of surgery four years ago today.

And even if I can’t average 35 miles a week, get back in racing shape, and have everything in life make sense again, I resolve I will not re-use any of my parking stickers in 2017 (well, I could probably change an 11 to a 14 or a 17 without arousing suspicion, or a 21 to a 24…).

But, whatever happens, on to 2017.  Happy New Year!

Two steps forward, one step back, another shot of cortisone and I’m back on track…

where-to-run-in-chicago

Sure, I’ve missed out on enough running days this October to last a lifetime, but it’s all good.   Yes, each runner I biked past on the lakefront trail this month put a little stab in my heart, but I’m not complaining.  Because it’s fall, glorious fall, and with every run I get to enjoy, all the bad feelings go away and I thank the running gods (and my doctor) that I can get out and lose myself in the crisp air, sunshine, falling leaves, and all the glory of the season.  I feel optimistic for what is to come, because we all know anything can happen, I mean, the Cubs are in the World Series, which just goes to show (again) that good things come to those who wait, and not just wait, but wait and plan and look ever forward and believe.

So at my last report I was coming off of my amazing summer of travel and feeling pretty good (knee, legs, fitness, et cetera) but not sure what kind of shape I was really in.  I hoped, as we all hope, and has actually happened for me in the past, to find myself somehow stronger and faster than expected (you know how it is when sometimes you put away the watch for a while and then bring it back out to be pleasantly surprised).  Alas, it was not to be….

Wait, before I get to that, I should explain that I couldn’t start back on a hard running program right away because I had to prepare for a 5K swim!  Yes, the Big Shoulders 5K swim in Lake Michigan on September 10th.  I remember saying to myself when I saw my lovely, perfect wife swim this six years ago that I could never swim that far.  Well, a couple knee surgeries and lots of swimming later, I did it.  Luckily, the water was flat that day (I big-shoulders-pre-raceprobably could have made it in rough water, but I’m not sure) (and I wore a wetsuit, which real swimmers will say is cheating, but I’m not a real swimmer—I’m a runner).  But in the service of being able to survive the event, I focused a lot of attention on swimming the last few weeks before Big Shoulders and couldn’t fully dedicate myself to running faster.

Okay, so back to my running…I did a few sessions on the track, including a broken 5K, which I enjoyed (“broken” is a swim term which means you break up the total distance but only keep track of the total time–I ran 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000, then back down the ladder (with about a minute rest between each) in 18:01.)  Not great, but at least I knew where I was (and I plan to do this workout again to see how I am progressing).  For my next workout, I met my friend Bill for a set of half-mile repeats on the bike path in Milwaukee.  We did 4 and I had to fight to average 3 minutes (Bill maybe 4-5 seconds ahead of me).  But these were very instructive.  As I tried to keep up with Bill, I could feel my legs were simply not strong enough so I decided (literally that day, as we were jogging back to our cars) to be more deliberate about lifting weights/doing core workouts, including lifting with my legs, 1-2 times per week.  It seems this is always my plan and I haven’t been able to maintain it, at least to the level I want, but I think it’s key for me.  Because of my knee, I can’t rely on  high mileage or hill repeats get stronger.  I’ve got to find other ways.  And so far, so good.  I’m even doing squats every time (which does not bother my knee, even when it’s bothering me) and I’m going to keep adding reps and weight and see what happens.

So, a week after our first day of half-mile repeats, Bill and I met again that day I was able to average 2:55, and felt better doing it.  I did a few other workouts (by myself, which means I’m inevitably a little slower than with someone else) but was happy with my progress.  I thought about doing a fall race, maybe a 5K or maybe something longer, but I’ve ruled that out now because it seems like every time I just start thinking about signing up for a race, my knee starts to hurt.  In fact, my knee was achy after my run on October 5th and I took a couple days off.  Then I had to actually stop only a half-mile into my run on the 8th.  Walking back home was depressing, yes, but I also knew it was just time for another shot of cortisone. It had been only 4 ½ months since my last, and I’ve been trying to make each last six months (though my doctor says every 4 months is fine) and so I missed a lot of beautiful days running both waiting to see my doctor and then for the inflammation to really go down after the injection. knee-cortisone

But now I’m feeling good again and it’s full-speed ahead (that’s a relative phrase, of course) for the rest of October and into November.  I am NOT going to sign up to do any races or even think about it, but I do have 2 workout goals I’ll be working towards.  The first is 3 times a mile averaging under 6 minutes a mile.  The second is 8 quarter-miles (well, 400 meters) averaging under 80 seconds.  These are not wildly ambitious, but I could not go out and do either one today so they are ambitious enough.  If I accomplish these, I may do a time trial on the track in lieu of a race, maybe 4000 meters or maybe a full 5000 just to see where I am before winter comes.

I remember when I did this some years back, it was November or maybe even early December after recovering from a fall marathon.  I hadn’t timed any workouts since the race and was just wondering what kind of shape I was in.  When I got to the track it was already so dark I couldn’t read my watch so I just set my countdown timer for 18 minutes and wanted to see how close I could get to cruising 3 miles in that time.  I felt great that night from the start, better after each lap, and was thinking to myself, I’m surely going to get to 3 miles or very close.  As I got closer and closerto 3 miles, I picked up my pace and when I crossed the line for the completion of 12 laps my timer still hadn’t gone off so I kept on  going.  I hadn’t planned for this and every stride thereafter felt like a gift, I grew  more and more buoyant with each one, like I was floating through the darkness, and I was able to run a whole nother half a lap, going a few strides past the 5000 meter mark and into the turn before my timer congratulated me and it was really one of my most enjoyable, memorable runs ever.

So I’d love to be able to replicate something like that, not quite that fast, but maybe close.  Of course, it’s probably not healthy, or productive really, to want to go back in time, though in a way that’s what I want to do.  I suppose that is one the burdens of life, wanting things we cannot have.  Does this make life more interesting or just more frustrating?  I don’t know, and right now I don’t care. It is a beautiful October morning and I am going out for a run 🙂

forest-preserves-cook-county-photo

Summer, don’t leave me now

Well, this has been an unusual, extraordinary summer.  Unusual because, as the word implies, much about it was “not” usual.   And extraordinary because, well, before I explain that, I’d like to look at that word:  extraordinary.  It’s been bothering me for a while.  At face value, it seems to mean “extra” ordinary, or “super” ordinary, or “very very” ordinary, but that’s not what it means.  No, it means “beyond” ordinary, “better than” ordinary, and that fits because this last summer has been, well, let me tell you about it….

First, as you may know, summers past I’ve focused on getting in as many workouts as possible.  All the way back to high school (back then getting ready for cross-country season) that’s been my focus.  With my job teaching, because I have more time in summer and the weather’s great and there’s more daylight and I have more energy, I’ve kept it up.  Lots of years, a fall marathon was that big goal to work for.  Since my knee surgery, it’s been, “Just get back into the best shape you can.  This might be the time to really get back to being yourself again.”  But no matter the goal, I’ve spent my summer stacking up runs, rides, and swims until my body couldn’t take any more.  I mean, within reason, of course.  I was never a superstar, just enthusiastic, and enjoyed throwing myself into it and the feeling of getting in shape made me happy.  So why not?

But this summer, my perfect lovely wife was taking a sabbatical.  Partly because she wanted (and had earned a break) from her job and partly because she always gets a little envious of my summer schedule. She’s an athlete too, super fast in the pool and she also enjoys running, but she’s got probably a healthier, better outlook on what one should do with one’s time in life.  So our sabbatical summer would not be endless days of:  wake up, enjoy a lazy morning, get in a workout, recover, work out again, eat a big dinner, stay off our feet, and get to bed early.  We were going to do more with the time we had and we’d been dreaming of a big trip for some time.  After much deliberation, we decided on….South Africa and, uh oh, I can feel myself falling into a detailed travelogue, which is not my intention, so let me just say we left for South Africa July 11th, returned home on 30th, then pick up the kids and went to the wilds of Alaska (where my wife’s brother and family live) from Aug 3-11th.   Both trips were fantastic, but instead of describing them, I’ll share some pictures:

Safari:

elephant from car

 

girafferhinos

 

elephants at waterhole

The Wild Coast, South Africa:

river lodgewild coast clear water

Bulungula, an African village:

village hill

 

sunset in villagevillage hut and full moon

Franschhoek (wine country):

panaroma wine country

rainbow in wine country

Cape Town and the Cape of Good Hope:

cape town from apartment

 

hike lion's headcape of good hope panorama

And then Alaska:

alaska eureka view

alaska lake

panaroma hike from cabinpanaroma copper river hike

As you can see, only a fool would complain about trips like these and I’m no fool and I’m not complaining and I had no hesitation in going full-on forward for our adventures.  But I was also aware that for a full month in the heart of summer, my prime training days would be otherwise spoken for, and I’ve got to tell you, I was a little worried about it, both how it would feel and to what extent I’d lose the fitness I’d been working to regain.

I knew that even if I’d been in racing shape, this would’ve been worth taking time off for.  No doubts.  No regrets.  Still, it was strange, to not be plotting out my summer schedule, not doing workouts, wondering where my training would lead me.  And when I did run, it didn’t feel like summer—it wasn’t hot, I wasn’t sweating and thirsty and spent like I’d usually be in July and August.  This was because I wasn’t doing hard workouts and also because it was winter in South Africa with moderate temps and we got about the same in Alaska (40’s-50’s at night, 60’s-70’s during the day).

We didn’t plan any of our days around running, but ran when we could and over the 32 days, I was able to get out 17 times, more than I’d expected, with some great runs on the beach along the coast of the Indian Ocean…

perfect running beach

and along a beautiful strip of highway in the Alaskan wilderness (bear spray in hand)…

alaska road

But none of these were timed, none very far, or fast, and I didn’t really think of them as training (as I had nothing to train for), just running.

So the point I sat down to make today is that I expected to return home mid-August feeling out of shape (I’d been feeling good before we left—ran Steamboat Classic 4 miler in June in 25:29 (cutting 1:20 from last year) and did a triathlon in July and was able to run the 5th fastest run time of all entrants (it was supposed to be a 10K but my time was 39:02 and I know I didn’t run that fast, but it was still a good run).  But I’m not feeling out of shape.  My legs, in terms of strength and form, actually feel better than they did when I left.  Maybe it was my less ambitious schedule, or the beach runs, or the long, hilly hikes we did in both South Africa and Alaska, but my legs feel great. I don’t know how far I am from racing shape because I haven’t timed myself yet, just wanting to enjoy it as long as I can, the feeling of feeling good running.  And it’s been so nice to run again in the heat and sun and I feel like I’m where I’m supposed to be, feeling good on my feet in the middle of nice, long summer.

But that’s not true because summer is nearly over.  I mean, I’m back to school next week, cross country season has started, the Packers will be embarking on their run to the Super Bowl (I hope) in a couple weeks.  It’s back to work time and I know I’m going to break out the watch soon.  I may even do it today—I’m heading to the track as soon as I finish this morning’s coffee, and I might run some 300’s just to see where I’m at. Of course, 300’s won’t tell the whole story.  I’ll need longer runs to see where I’m really at.  I know I’m not in great shape, don’t have that lightness that comes with being fast and fit.  But I’m in a good, solid place.  My knee is good, my form feels good, I feel strong, healthy, optimistic.  Over the course of the next couple months I do hope to get in some good weeks, some fast workouts, then maybe a race or two in November if I think I can really do them with some level of success.

So it’s been a great summer, unusual and extraordinary, once-in-a-lifetime, at least only once so far in my lifetime, but this summer, even more than most, is going to be over too soon.  I  want these last few days to slow down.  It’s like, I’m finally ready for summer, but summer is ready to leave.

The Amnesia Training Plan

So for the first four months of the year I’ve been following what I’m calling “The Amnesia Training Plan.”  Essentially, this means I tried to just run and forget about everything that happened over the last 3 ½ years (tearing up my knee, having microfracture surgery, 6 weeks on crutches, 9 months not running, all the fits and starts of trying to get back into some kind of shape, et cetera).  I decided to just feign ignorance about all of it.  What?  Who?  Me?  No, you must you be thinking of someone else.  I’m fine.   Sure, it was out of desperation, but it struck me that maybe the best way to get back to being the runner I’d been before the injury was to just tell myself I was–to fool myself into believing it.

enjoying-memory-loss

To give a little historical perspective, over the years my running schedule has been seasonal and generally followed this pattern:

March-May: increase weekly mileage, start speed work, consider doing races (but always decide to wait)

June-July:  increase mileage and intensity, do some races, bike and swim (I have lots of time and energy in summer)

August:  grind out highest mileage weeks of the year, do my most challenging workouts, continue cross-training

September-October:  alternate high-mileage weeks and race weeks, usually run a marathon

November:  cut back on mileage but enjoy fitness left over from a good year of running, maybe one more race, start planning for the next year

December-February:  cut way back on mileage, do very little, if any, speed work, get a little bit out of shape, play basketball and/or swim and lift weights

Now that is my pre-injury schedule.  And the point I’m trying to make is that being in underwhelming running condition the first week of January, well, that felt pretty familiar to me.  And so this last January, after another subpar workout, I thought to myself, wouldn’t it be great if I could just slog through these next few months and then get back in shape like I used to.  I mean, really get back in shape, like when spring rolls around start running fast again.  I mean, there’s no reason I can’t, right?  My knee is holding up, I’m not too old.  Other people are doing it.  I’ve done it before.  It should just be a matter of putting in the work, right?

I knew it was more complicated than that, but instead of embracing all the ways it could be complicated, I decided to see it in as simple of terms as possible:  just run like you used to and you’ll be the runner you used to be.

Now though I hadn’t been satisfied, I had, at the end of last year, begun to FEEL like my old self at times.  That is, on good days I’d run and FEEL like I was really running, moving smoothly, efficiently, like the good old me.  This was great, and my biggest goal when I couldn’t run was just to experience that feeling again.  However, if I timed myself on one of these glorious days, well, no matter how good or fast I felt, I was still quite a bit behind my old self.  So, in order to become the old me again I really only had two options:  #1) run faster or #2) forget about how fast I was running.  Obviously, my ultimate goal was #1) run faster, but I couldn’t do that at the snap of my fingers.  I realized that I could; however, instantaneously achieve #2) forget about how fast I was running.

 

And so that’s what I did.  Along with lots of swimming, through January (22 miles a week), February (28 miles a week), March (23 miles a week), and April (34 miles a week), when I  ran, I thought about feeling good and didn’t think about pace.  Whereas I’d been very running-meme-1deliberate about my training since my injury and had done a lot of timed workouts, knowing I had to run fast to re-activate the muscles that had gotten weak, this was different.  I just ran.  I had good days and bad days.  I felt heavy.  I felt light.  I felt slow.  I felt fast.  But I didn’t think much about it, because just like in the old days, I told myself I’d worry about times and pace and speed and racing when the snow melts.

Now I thought this might work, but I also knew it was risky, that there was a chance I’d get even slower and be further from my ultimate goal.  Still, I told myself ahead of time that even if that happens I won’t regret it because for a while I could least enjoy my running a little more.  I mean, I appreciate every step I can run, and I’m realistic about my goals, but thinking about how slow I was going would sap a little of the joy out of it. I mean, there’s nothing like than facing your own shortcomings, your limitations, to make you feel shitty about things.  But I do it for the reason all runners do it, because getting in shape to run the best you can makes it all worth it.

That last sentence signals to me that I’m itching to embark on some philosophical musings about competition and the MEANING OF EVERYTHING, but I told myself to stay focused today, so let’s move on the question:  how did the “Amnesia Training Plan” work?  Well, I’ve only done a few timed workouts, but I’ve been pleasantly surprised with them.  For example, I did a track workout with the triathlon team I train with and we were doing 6 800’s.  I had no idea what kind of pace I could maintain and hoped to average just under 3 minutes for each but I ended up averaging 2:52 with the last one in 2:47 (which is still slower than I was pre-injury, but definitely the fastest I’ve done since the injury).  I also ran a three mile solo tempo run on a cool, windy day in 19:40 and this was a comfortable effort and I could have kept going and last May I exhausted myself running 20:30 on the very same course.  So again, I’m not the old me yet, but things are definitely looking up and I’m looking forward to more speed workouts and some 40+ mile weeks.  I still plan to do most of my runs without a watch, but a couple times a week I’ll do my hard workouts and hope to see them improve pretty steadily until my first race of the year, which will be in June and then I’ll really know how far I’ve come and how much further I’ve got to go.

If you’ve missed me, well, I couldn’t write any posts for this blog when I had my self-induced amnesia, because before I got hurt I never thought about writing a running blog.  The old me wouldn’t have had much to say.  The new me does, of course, and I’m looking forward to updating you on all the amazing progress I will make in the next few months (I hope, I hope).

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